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Looking for Coaches and Assistants

We are currently looking for U9 and U13 Boys Coaches and Assistants to help us this season.
Please contact Ryan Orr if you are interested in this exciting opportunity. ryan.stewart.orr@gmail.com

2005 Boys, 2007 Boys and 2008 Boys Selects Players NEEDED

Our 2005 Boys team is looking for additional players for this upcoming season.  Please contact Coach Tyler  if you are interested in playing at a higher level tyler.hannah_8@hotmail.com

Our 2007 Boys team is looking for additional players for this upcoming season.  Please contact Coach Amber if you are interested in playing at a higher level amb.morris@gmail.com

Our 2008 Boys team is looking for additional players for this upcoming season, we are also looking for a keeper.  Please contact Coach Mike  if you are interested in playing at a higher level leahcimjd@hotmail.com

U15 Girls MW Selects won Bronze at Surf Cup in San Diego

2018 EMSA Presidents Award Winner

We would like  to congratulate Diana Clark for receiving the Presidents award from the president of EMSA.

This is the highest award given to an individual who has volunteered and dedicated their last 20 years plus to their Community and MWSA.
Well deserved Diana!

Soccer Centre Admission Passes

EDMONTON SOCCER ASSOCIATION FACILITIES

Cost and Location of Soccer Centres
All individuals (e.g., parents, friends, and other family members) will be required to pay a facility admission fee prior to entering any of the Edmonton Soccer Centres. Pricing is set by the Indoor Facilities and may be subject to change.

Current 2018 2019 season prices are:
Ages 17 and under – FREE
Ages 65 and over – FREE
Spectators 18 and over – $5 Daily Admission
Spectators 18 and over – $33 Individual Season Pass
(Prices subject to change) 

The Individual Season Pass is valid for one person’s admission and could be used within an immediate family (i.e. mother or father on separate occasions). The pass allows only one person’s admission without charge when more than one immediate family member is present.

A valid pass must be shown by each person seeking entry.

Player and Coach Admission Passes are to be used by players and coaches ONLY and are non-transferable. Passes must be shown for admission to the centres.
Games may be played at one of the following centers:
Edmonton South Center 6520 Roper Road
Edmonton West Center 17415-106A Ave
Edmonton East Center 12720 Victoria Trail
Millennium Place 2000 Premier Way, Sherwood Park
Trans Alta Tri-Leisure Center, Spruce Grove 221 Campsite Road.
(Half way between Highway 16 and 16a)
Servus Credit Union Place 400 Campbell Road

Reminder for Parents and Coaches

10 Ways You Are Causing Your Child Sport Induced Stress

10 Ways You Are Causing Your Child Sport Induced Stress

Participating in a sport is supposed to be fun. In fact, a recent survey conducted by the American Psychological Association estimates that 9 percent of all children use sports to help manage stress. For those children, sports can be fun, but for many children, sports can be extremely stressful.

Children taking part in competitive sports often feel stressed, but the cause of that stress may be surprising to some parents. Often, it isn’t the coaches or your children’s teammates that are causing the stress; it could be you — and you may not even know you’re doing it! Are you guilty of any of these stress-inducing behaviors? Avoid stressing your child out during sports activities by remembering these stressful behaviors parents engage in during games, practices or even around the house.

  1. Talking About Your Own Great Sports Accomplishments

Sharing your own sports accomplishments may be inspiring to your child, but if you keep bringing them up, it could become stressful. Many children experience sport-induced stress from hearing stories about how great their parents were at a sport because they feel they have to accomplish the same things their parents did.

  1. Comparing Your Child To Other Team Members/Children

Children have their own unique talents and abilities when it comes to a certain sport. Comparing them to other children or other teammates could produce feelings of anxiety and stress, especially when they are unable to perform the same skills or at the same level as the other child.

  1. Turning Into A Bleacher Coach

You may think coaching from the sidelines is offering your child extra support or help, but it really is just confusing them. Children will feel extreme levels of stress with “bleacher” coaching from parents because they do not know to whom to listen for advice. Should they do what the coach is telling them, or should they listen to their parent?

  1. Making Sports The Center Of Your (And Your Child’s) World

Yes, there are a lot of things that can come from engaging in sports. Scholarships, wonderful opportunities to travel and even jobs, but there is no reason it should become the center of your world or your child’s. What if they want to try a different sport or they get injured? Sports may not always be there, and if it’s all you talk about, your child will feel obligated to stay in sports long after they no longer want to play.

  1. Arguing With The Coach Over Sports Decisions

If all parents had their way, their children would play in every game the entire time. But that decision rests with the coaches, not the parents — and for good reason. Don’t spend the time arguing with the coaching staff about how often your child is playing. It is embarrassing and stressful for your child!

  1. Living Vicariously Through Your Child

It’s natural to want what is best for your child, but when it comes to sports, you have to follow your child’s lead and let them pick the sports they want to take part in. Introduce your children to a sport you played when you were younger, but don’t force them to play just because you loved it and want to relive the good old days.

  1. Making Every Game Seem Like Life Or Death

No parent likes to see their child lose, and you don’t want to encourage a child to have a “who cares?” attitude, but it is important to make sure winning isn’t everything. When winning is everything, a child will feel tremendous pressure to impress all the time.

  1. Forcing Extra Practice Sessions

Children need practice to succeed at sports, but scheduling several extra practice sessions a week can be overwhelming to youngsters and stressful/harmful on the body. Feel free to encourage your children to practice, but don’t force them to practice for hours in addition to their regular practice sessions.

 

  1. Overbooking Your Child’s Schedule

It is tempting to want to sign up a child for every sport they show a remote interest in, but many sports seasons overlap. The overlapping season leads to an overbooked schedule for your child, which leaves them tired, cranky and experiencing sports-induced stress. Pick one or two sports to focus on. It will be enough to keep you and your child busy.

  1. Missing Important Family Events For Minor Sports Events

Scheduling conflicts between your child’s sports team and family events are inevitable. If the family event is important to you or other family members, skipping it could cause your child to feel an overwhelming amount of stress or guilt. After all, you’d be missing something important because of their interest in a sport.

CONCUSSION POCKET TOOL FOR COACHES

Alberta Soccer Association (ASA) has a Pocket Concussion Tool Handout, CLICK HERE